Of all the wonderful advancements digital technologies and the internet have afforded us, decision-making has suffered the consequences of information overload. In fact, too many options can be crippling, as one 2000 study conducted at Stanford shows.

Consumers given the option of tasting six jam jars were more likely to purchase one of the selection than those given twenty-four jars to sample. I think of this study whenever I open Netflix without having a specific selection. Add in the fact that I have HBO, Hulu, and Amazon Prime to tune into, and more often than not I choose to read a book rather than spend a half-hour trying to figure out what I want to watch.

Research like this reminds us that as diverse as humans can seem in practice, there’s similar hardware behind each of us. That means the software is going to be relatively similar as well. As Ray Dalio recognized in Principles, computers could do the prediction and analysis work in seconds that would take him days. The system he created at Bridgewater is what made him a billionaire.

Coegil designed its system for decision makers. If you have an idea, it will link you to research being done and people working on similar problems in the same field. Focused on the fostering of communities to reach ideal decisions, the Decision Science platform utilizes blockchain to ensure clarity and security in your entire decision-making process.

The Tech Tribune just named Coegil one of the nine best Stamford, CT startups. Basing their decisions on revenue potential, leadership team, brand traction, and competitive landscape, the publication might have even used Coegil’s services in coming to their decision. Though perhaps not—for now.